Double fault by tennis superstar Naomi Osaka

 

Tennis superstar Naomi Osaka has put the ball over the line again with her refusal to “do any press” at the French Open.

What she couched as support for mental health is, in fact, a grandiose gesture that suggests the 23-year-old is getting too big for her Nike Air Zoom GP Turbos.

“I’m writing this to say I’m not going to do any press during Roland Garros,” said Osaka in a statement posted to her social media accounts. “I’ve often felt that people have no regard for athletes’ mental health and this rings true whenever I see a press conference or partake in one. We are often sat there and asked questions that we’ve been asked multiple times before or asked questions that bring doubt into our minds and I’m just not going to subject myself to people that doubt me.” Continue reading “Double fault by tennis superstar Naomi Osaka”

Ego poisons radio’s culture

Commercial radio really must stop feeding the Ego Monster.

By over-inflating the self-worth of some of their employees, the broadcasters create risks for the public, toxic environments, and rods for their own backs.

The problem is not limited to radio hosts, although they are the most obvious manifestation of the abnormality. It affects executives and, indeed, anyone in the organisation who buys into the belief that they are personally contributing to success in the latest audience ratings. Continue reading “Ego poisons radio’s culture”

THE WEEKLY, THE ROYALS, AND THE WOMAN WHO MADE IT ALL HAPPEN

This presentation was delivered at the Auckland City Art Gallery on 12 May 2021 by my wife, Jenny Lynch, as a tribute to her mentor – fellow New Zealand Woman’s Weekly editor Jean Wishart

 She was a publishing icon. An editor whose magazine became the top selling womens publication per head of population in the world.

 She was also an astute businesswoman. She became the first woman in the country to sit on the board of a listed company– NZ News. And the first woman in its 124-year history to be elected to the council of the Auckland Chamber of Commerce.

 Above all she was someone who became a valued friend — I use that word advisably — to thousands upon thousands of New Zealand magazine readers during much of the latter part of last century.

Im talking about Miss Jean Wishart, New Zealand Womans Weekly editor from 1952 to 1985.

Continue reading “THE WEEKLY, THE ROYALS, AND THE WOMAN WHO MADE IT ALL HAPPEN”